DIY Coastal Turk Head Knot Coasters


Feeling inspired by nautical decor? These Turk Knot Coasters are the perfect project for you! Try your hand at weaving to create lovely coasters, using only rope and a little glue!

Difficulty level: Intermediate
Time to complete: 1 hour
Age range: 12 and up

Things you’ll need:
Macrame cord
Hot glue gun/hot glue sticks
Scissors
Cardboard
Pushpins
Coaster

Things to do:
1. Lay a coaster on your piece of cardboard and trace along the outside edge.


2. Push 5 pushpins in along the perimeter of the outline. The pushpins should be in the shape of a star.

3. Cut a 6 1/2 foot piece of rope.

4. Now we’re ready to start knotting! First, we’re going to create the initial pattern. Lay the end of your rope 1 inch away from the bottom left pushpin and loop it around the top pushpin.
5. Next, pull the rope down around the bottom left pushpin and up around the top left pushpin.
6. Pull the rope across to the top right pushpin, laying it over all of your other pieces of rope. Swing down around the bottom right pushpin.
7. Pull the rope up to the top left pushpin and back down to the bottom right, pulling it under all other pieces of rope. The finished pattern should have five “points.”

8. When you have your initial pass or pattern complete, simply repeat the steps until you run out of rope.

9. Use hot glue to secure the end of the rope in place. If your rope doesn’t want to stay in place, reinforce your pattern with hot glue.

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DIY Succulent Embroidery Hoop Wall Hanging Set


This set of succulents is a great way to bring some greenery to your home without worrying about watering. You can make the entire set of hoops, or if you don’t have room on your wall, just make one. You can substitute air plants, flowers, or any other pretty greenery you’d like.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Time required: 30 minutes
Age range: 12 and up

Things you’ll need:
7″ wood embroidery hoop
5″ wood embroidery hoop
3″ wood embroidery hoop
Jute twine
Assorted artificial succulents
Scissors
Wire cutters (optional)

Things to do:
1. Twist the screw on top of each embroidery hoop, separating the two parts of each hoop. Set aside the pieces with the screw top for now.

2. Starting with the largest hoop and leaving a long tail of twine, estimate how much twine you need by wrapping the twine around the hoop four times and adding a few more inches to the length. Trim the twine with scissors, then cut an additional matching length of twine so that you have two lengths.

3. Using one length of twine and once again leaving a long tail of twine, wrap the twine around the hoop four times as tightly as you can.

4. Trim the twine, leaving a long tail. Flip the hoop over, then knot the two twine ends together, ensuring the twine is taut on the hoop.

Tip: This part can be a little tricky to complete on your own, so you might want to have someone help you knot to make sure it’s taut.
5. Repeat steps 2-4, this time wrapping on the opposite side of the hoop with the second length of twine.

6. Place the screw-top piece onto the twine hoop and screw it in place to secure it, centering the screw with the crossed pieces of twine. (You may have to loosen it a little more to get it to fit over the twine.) This is a great time to make adjustments, evening out the twine.
7. Trim the ends of the twine as close to the knot as you can.

8. Repeat steps 2-7 with the 5″ hoop, this time wrapping the twine around the hoop only three times.

9. Repeat steps 2-7 with the 3″ hoop, this time wrapping the twine around the hoop only two times.

10. Decide which succulents you’d like to use. Larger stems can be difficult to weave through the twine, so if your succulent has a thick stem, you can remove it to reveal a thinner stem.

For succulents that are in a large bunch, you can use wire cutters to trim individual succulents away.

11. Place one or more succulents in each hoop, weaving the stem in and out of the twine to make sure it’s secure.

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Woven Popsicle Stick Butterfly Tutorial


Looking for a fun craft to do with your kids? These popsicle stick butterflies are simply to make, but also let kids stretch their creative muscles! Give them some yarn and beads and watch their imaginations take flight!

Difficulty level: Beginner
Time to complete: 20 minutes
Age range: 6 and up

Things you’ll need:
Popsicle sticks
Yarn
Scissors
Pipe cleaners
Wooden beads
Hot glue gun/glue sticks

Things to do:
1. Start by arranging your popsicle sticks in an “X” shape and use glue to secure them in place.


2. Cut a piece of pipe cleaner in half and roll one end of both pieces – These will be your butterfly’s antennas.


3. Slide a bead up both pipe cleaners, just below the antenna rolls. This is your butterfly’s head.

4. Slide your popsicle stick “X” just below the head and two more beads on below it to hold it in place.

5. Fold the pipe cleaners up around the bottom bead to secure it in place.
6. Use hot glue to attach a piece of yarn to the popsicle sticks and start wrapping it around the “X” shape. Change colors when you reach half way and finish wrapping the popsicle sticks. Wrap the other side of the “X” in the same way.

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DIY Teacup Bird Feeder Tutorial


This darling bird feeder adds a whimsical touch to your yard decor. Make several in different colors and welcome the animals this spring!

Difficulty level: Beginner
Time to complete: 10 minutes
Age range: 10 and up

Things you’ll need:
Teacup and saucer
Glue
Scissors
Twine

Things to do:
1. Use E6000 Glue to attach your tea cup to its saucer. The handle should be facing straight up. Let the glue dry completely before moving on.



2. Cut a 4-foot piece of twine and tie the end to the center of the tea cup handle.

3. Fill the cup with birdseed so it spills out onto the saucer and hang from a tree to feed the birds.

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DIY Antique Storage Jars


Spruce up your space with this trendy storage solution! Make a set of these antique storage jars and use them to organize your bathroom products like Q-tips and cotton balls!

Difficulty level: Beginner
Time to complete: 30 minutes
Age range: 12 and up

Things you’ll need:
Mason jar
Artificial flowers
Mod Podge
Antique white acrylic paint
Foam brush
Hot glue gun/hot glue sticks

Things to do:
1. Trim off a small bunch of flowers and dip them in your jar of Mod Podge. Let them drip over the container for a few minutes before laying it aside to dry for 24-hours.




2. When your Mod Podge flowers are dry, paint them with a thick layer of acrylic paint.

3. Paint the lid of the mason jar with acrylic paint.
4. Use glue to attach the flowers to the lid of the mason jar. Trim away any part of the stem that extends over the lid.

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How to Make a Mini Macrame Wall Hanging Tutorial


Once you’ve learned the three basic Macrame knots, it’s time to take on a wall hanging! This mini project is a great place to start practicing your knotting skills.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Time to complete: 30 minutes
Age range: 12 and up

Things you’ll need:
Dowel
Macrame cord
Scissors

Things to do:
1. Cut seven pieces of macrame cord that measure 5-feet in length.


2. Fold your macrame cord in half, lay the dowel over the loop in the center and flip the ends over the dowel and up through the loop. Repeat this step with all seven pieces of macrame cord.

3. Now you’re ready to knot! You don’t need a pattern to make a mini macrame, just start knotting, alternating between the square knot, spiral knot, and half hitch knot. For my mini macrame wall hanging, I started with the four cords on the far left and tied square knots about 3 inches down.
4. Next, I moved to the next four cords and tied spiral knots until they reached the same length as my square knots.
5. Finally, I moved to the remaining six cords and tied half-hitch knots, until I reached the same length as my square and spiral knots.
6. To finish the piece, alternate between the square knot, spiral knot, and half-hitch knot until you’ve reach the end of your cords.
7. Trim any excess cord.
8. Cut a two-foot piece of macrame cord and tie it to both ends of your dowel, creating a hanger.

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Macrame 101 | The Half-Hitch Knot Tutorial


Want to learn how to macrame? This is a great place to start! The Half-Hitch Knot brings movement and variation to your macrame project and is super simple to tie!

Difficulty level: Beginner
Time to complete: 10 minutes
Age range: 8 and up

Things you’ll need:
Scissors
Macrame cord
Dowel

Things to do:
1. You’ll need three lengths of cord for this knot. Measure and cut three three-foot long pieces of macrame.


2. First, attach the three lengths of macrame to the dowel. Fold the macrame in half and lay the top of the loop under the dowel. Fold the ends up and through the top loop, securing the piece of macrame to the dowel.


3. Now you’re ready to knot! Stretch the far left piece diagonally across the five macrame cords.

4. Pull your diagonal anchor cord tight and loop the next cord in line in a “U” shape, laying the end over the diagonal cord. Loop the end over the diagonal anchor and through the center of “U” shape. Pull it tightly. Repeat this step with the same cord before moving on to the next cord in line.




5. When you come to the end of your line of cords, pull the diagonal anchor the other direction and start over.


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DIY Flower Bun Wrap Tutorial


This pretty bun wrap can brighten up any day. When you’re not wearing this as a bun wrap, you can wear it as a piece of jewelry – maybe a bracelet or even an anklet.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Time required: 30 minutes
Age range: 12 and up

Things you’ll need:
Wire cutters
Cloth-covered floral wire
Purple artificial aster mum bundle
Purple artificial pansy pick
Light pink flowering pip berry spray
Floral tape
Turquoise organza ribbon
Ruler
Scissors

Things to do:
1. Cut a length of cloth-covered floral wire about 12″ long for an adult’s accessory or about 10″ long for a child’s accessory.

2. Fold the floral wire in half.

3. Using your fingers, bend the open end of the loop over.

4. Twist the open end of the loop around the wire to close the loop.

You should have one doubled piece of wire with small loops on each end.

5. Grab each end of the wire with your fingers, then gently twist it a few times.

6. Using the wire cutters, clip the following flowers, leaving a 2″ stem: 4 pink pip berry spray flowers, 4 purple pansies, and 2 purple aster mums.

7. For the aster mums, gently remove the thick stem to reveal the thinner stem underneath. (This will make wrapping easier later.)

8. Lay out your flowers in the following order: 2 pink flowers, 2 pansies, 2 aster mums, 2 pansies, 2 pink flowers.

9. Add two pink flowers to the wire, tucking the stems through the twisted loop next to the small loop.

10. Using your finger, move the stem of the first flower to be parallel with the wire. Wrap the stem with floral tape around the wire, pulling the floral tape gently as you wrap to activate the stickiness. When you finish, do not cut the floral tape.

11. Add two pansies, tucking the stems just next to the pink flowers.

12. Move the pansy stems parallel with the wire, then wrap the stems with floral tape.

13. Repeat these steps, bending the stems and taping them, until you have secured all the flowers.

14. After you’ve taped the last flower stems, wrap the tape in the opposite direction, back across the entire wire again to secure all the stems. Trim the floral tape. Tip: If there are stems sticking out anywhere, make sure they’re secure and then trim them with the wire cutters.

15. Cut a 30″ length of ribbon, then thread it through the small loops on the floral wire.

16. Since wrapping the flowers may have shifted them around a bit, you may want to bend your flowers to arrange and neaten them.

17. To style the wrap, place it on top of your bun, then tie it below the bun.

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Macrame 101 | The Spiral Knot Tutorial


Want to learn how to macrame? This is a great place to start! The Spiral Knot is an adaption to the Square Knot. It adds texture and variation to your macrame projects.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Time to complete: 10 minutes
Age range: 8 and up

Things you’ll need:
Scissors
Macrame
Dowel

Things to do:
1. You’ll need two lengths of cord for this knot. Measure and cut two three-foot long pieces of macrame.


2. First, attach the two lengths of macrame to the dowel. Fold the macrame in half and lay the top of the loop under the dowel. Fold the ends up and through the top loop, securing the piece of macrame to the dowel.

3. Now you’re ready to knot! Spread your four ends of macrame out flat and fold the piece on the far left over the middle two and under the far right piece. It should make a “4” shape.


4. Take the far right piece and fold it under the middle two and up through the center of the “4”.

5. Pull both ends tight, creating your first part of the knot.

6. Repeat this step, starting with the piece of cord on the left every time. It will slowly start creating a spiral pattern.

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Serving Tray with Scallop Cork Tutorial


Use this little tray for serving drinks that won’t slide around, or keep the tray on a coffee table for decoration with a little vase and flower when you’re not hosting.

Difficulty level: Beginner
Time required: 30 minutes active time, plus additional time for paint to dry
Age range: 12 and up

Things you’ll need:
Wood tray
Foam brush
Lavender Apple Barrel acrylic paint
Round cork pads
Regency Blue Apple Barrel acrylic paint
Scissors
Pencil

Things to do:
1. Paint the tray with two coats of lavender acrylic paint using a foam brush. Allow the tray to dry between coats.

2. While you wait for the tray to dry, paint the cork pads with two thick coats of regency blue acrylic paint. Allow the cork pads to dry.

3. Using scissors, cut cork pads in half. You can cut them directly on the backing paper, but if the pads start to slide around you can remove them from the backing paper and cut them in half one at a time.

4. If the cork pad has excess paint on the sides, use your fingers to scrape it away before you stick it to the tray.

5. Begin placing cork pads on the tray, starting along the bottom edge and placing the flat edge of the pads along the edge of the tray.

6. Continue across until the entire edge is covered.

7. Begin placing the cork pads along the top edge, placing the flat edge of the pads along the edge of the tray.

8. Continue across until the entire edge is covered.

9. Place one of your cork pad backing pieces flush against the edge of the tray, just beside the opening of the tray handle. Use a pencil to trace a straight line across the middle of the tray.

10. Move the backing piece to the other side of the tray handle opening, then trace a second line across the center.

11. Place cork pads one at a time against the first pencil line, making sure the scallops face the same direction as the scallops on the closest edge.

12. Continue across until you have covered the entire pencil line.

13. Place cork pads one at a time against the second pencil line, again making sure the scallops face the same direction as the scallops on the closest edge.

14. Continue across until you have covered the entire pencil line.

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